section 83(2)

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Section 83(2) defines prize fight and includes exceptions for amateur combative sports and boxing/mixed martial arts contests held with permission.

SECTION WORDING

83(2) In this section, "prize fight" means an encounter or fight with fists, hands or feet between two persons who have met for that purpose by previous arrangement made by or for them, but does not include (a) a contest between amateur athletes in a combative sport with fists, hands or feet held in a province if the sport is on the programme of the International Olympic Committee or the International Paralympic Committee and, in the case where the provinces lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by him or her requires it, the contest is held with their permission; (b) a contest between amateur athletes in a combative sport with fists, hands or feet held in a province if the sport has been designated by the provinces lieutenant governor in council or by any other person or body specified by him or her and, in the case where the lieutenant governor in council or other specified person or body requires it, the contest is held with their permission; (c) a contest between amateur athletes in a combative sport with fists, hands or feet held in a province with the permission of the provinces lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by him or her; and (d) a boxing contest or mixed martial arts contest held in a province with the permission or under the authority of an athletic board, commission or similar body established by or under the authority of the provinces legislature for the control of sport within the province.

EXPLANATION

Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada defines the term "prize fight" and provides exceptions to this definition. The section makes it illegal for two individuals to engage in a pre-arranged fight using fists, hands, or feet for monetary gain or reward. Such an act is deemed a criminal offense punishable by imprisonment. However, the section provides exceptions to this prohibition. These exceptions apply to amateur contests in combative sports with fists, hands, or feet held in a province. The exception applies if the sport is on the International Olympic Committee or International Paralympic Committee program and is held with the permission of the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by them. Also, such a contest can be designated by the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by them. Furthermore, a contest can be held with the consent of a province's lieutenant governor in council. In this case, it does not matter if the sport is designated or on the International Olympic committee's or International Paralympic committee's program or not. Finally, a boxing or mixed martial arts contest held under the authority of an athletic board, commission, or similar body established by or under the authority of the province is deemed legal. In conclusion, section 83(2) of the Criminal Code seeks to regulate prize fights in Canada to prevent illegal and dangerous fights. It balances this with the need to allow important combative sports to continue, especially in the amateur context.

COMMENTARY

Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada provides a definition for what constitutes a prize fight". This definition is important because it outlines which types of fights are considered illegal under Canadian law. In essence, a prize fight involves a pre-arranged physical encounter between two people who have come together for the specific purpose of fighting each other using fists, hands or feet. However, there are several exceptions to this definition of a prize fight that are listed in the section. For example, amateur athletes participating in a combative sport with fists can hold contests in a province as long as the sport is on the program of the International Olympic Committee or the International Paralympic Committee. Similarly, amateur sports can be designated as permissible through the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by them. As well, contests may be held with the permission of the lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by them. Furthermore, the section allows for boxing or mixed martial arts contests to be held in a province with the permission or under the authority of an athletic board or similar body established by the province's legislature for the control of sports within the province. This provision recognizes that combat sports like boxing and mixed martial arts are legitimate sports and can be practiced and enjoyed under the proper regulatory framework. Overall, the purpose of Section 83(2) is to provide a clear and consistent definition for what constitutes a prize fight", while also establishing guidelines for which types of physical combat are permissible under the law. The exceptions and provisions listed in the section enable amateur sports and combative sports to be enjoyed by Canadians as a legal and regulated activity. However, it is important to note that while there are exceptions to the definition of a prize fight, there are still strict regulations and rules in place to protect the safety and well-being of the athletes participating in these types of contests. For example, regulations on weight classes, protective gear, and medical examinations before and after a fight are all in place to ensure the safety of the fighters. In conclusion, Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada is an important provision that defines what constitutes a prize fight" and provides guidelines for which types of physical combat are permissible under the law. The section's numerous exceptions and provisions enable sports such as boxing and mixed martial arts to be enjoyed legally and under the proper regulatory framework. Ultimately, this benefits both athletes and society as a whole by supporting safe and responsible participation in physical competitions.

STRATEGY

Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada deals with the organization and holding of prize fights. As per the law, prize fights are criminal offenses, and anyone who organizes or participates in them can be charged with a criminal offense. The section contains several exceptions that allow for the organization of amateur fights or professional boxing and mixed martial arts contests if held with the permission of the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by him or her. Strategic Considerations: When dealing with Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada, there are several strategic considerations one should keep in mind. These include: 1. Compliance with Provincial Regulations: Provincial regulations need to be followed when organizing a boxing or mixed martial arts contest. These regulations differ from one province to another, and it is essential to be aware of them to ensure compliance before organizing the contest. 2. Obtaining Approval: Organizers must obtain permission from the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by him or her before holding the contest. Failure to obtain permission can result in criminal charges being filed against the organizers. 3. Safety Measures: Organizers must take appropriate safety measures to ensure that the contest is held in a safe and secure environment. These measures may include providing necessary safety equipment to the participants, such as gloves, mouthguards, and helmets. 4. Adherence to Rules: Contest rules must be clearly defined and adhered to, ensuring that they comply with the provincial regulations governing the sport. Any violation of the rules can result in disqualification or even criminal charges. 5. Insurance Coverage: Organizers must obtain adequate insurance coverage for the event, ensuring that they are protected against any claims that may arise due to injury or other occurrences during the contest. Strategies: When dealing with Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada, several strategies can be employed to ensure compliance and the successful organization of the contest. These include: 1. Engage with Provincial Authorities: Engage with the province's lieutenant governor in council or any other person or body specified by him or her and familiarize yourself with provincial regulations governing the sport. 2. Proper Planning: Develop a comprehensive plan that outlines the contest rules, safety measures, and insurance coverage to ensure compliance with provincial regulations. 3. Obtain Professional Assistance: It may be beneficial to obtain the services of a professional who can help navigate the complexities surrounding the organization of boxing or mixed martial arts contests and comply with provincial regulations. 4. Public Relations: Engage in effective public relations campaigns to promote the contest, ensuring that it receives the necessary attention from the target audience. 5. Budgeting: Develop a budget for the contest that takes into account the costs of insurance coverage, safety equipment, and other related expenses. In conclusion, Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada places restrictions on the organization of prize fights and contains several exceptions for boxing and mixed martial arts contests held with the permission of provincial authorities. Compliance with these regulations is critical, and the adoption of appropriate strategies can ensure successful organization while avoiding any potential legal or safety issues.

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