section 810.2(5)

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

A judge may prohibit a defendant from possessing firearms or other weapons if it is deemed necessary for their safety or that of others.

SECTION WORDING

810.2(5) The provincial court judge shall consider whether it is desirable, in the interests of the defendants safety or that of any other person, to prohibit the defendant from possessing any firearm, cross-bow, prohibited weapon, restricted weapon, prohibited device, ammunition, prohibited ammunition or explosive substance, or all of those things. If the judge decides that it is desirable to do so, the judge shall add that condition to the recognizance and specify the period during which the condition applies.

EXPLANATION

Section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code of Canada pertains to the power of a provincial court judge to impose conditions on an accused person who is released on bail pending trial. Specifically, this provision allows the judge to prohibit the defendant from possessing certain items deemed to pose a risk to public safety. These items include firearms, cross-bows, prohibited or restricted weapons or devices, ammunition, and explosive substances. The ability to impose such conditions is granted to the judge in cases where it is considered desirable, either in the interests of the defendant's safety or that of the general public. By prohibiting possession of such items, the judge is aiming to reduce the risk that the defendant will cause harm to themselves or others while awaiting trial. The judge has discretion to evaluate the situation and decide whether or not imposing these conditions is necessary and for how long the prohibition will apply. This decision can be made based on a number of factors, including the nature of the alleged offense, the defendant's history, and the potential for the defendant to engage in further criminal activity. Should a defendant violate the conditions imposed under Section 810.2(5), they may face further legal penalties and consequences. The judge's decision to impose these conditions, and the defendant's compliance with them, can have a significant impact on the ultimate outcome of a criminal case. Overall, Section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code plays a critical role in balancing the rights of an accused person with public safety concerns during the pretrial process. By prohibiting access to certain dangerous items, judges can aim to prevent further harm and promote better outcomes for all parties involved.

COMMENTARY

Section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code of Canada empowers a provincial court judge to impose a condition that prohibits an accused person from possessing firearms, crossbows, prohibited weapons, restricted weapons, prohibited devices, ammunition, prohibited ammunition, or explosive substances. This condition can be added to a recognizance with the aim of protecting the defendant and others from potential harm. It is essential to note that this provision is only applicable when there is a serious concern that the defendant could pose a threat to public safety if they had access to dangerous weapons. The inclusion of this provision in the Criminal Code of Canada is a testament to the fact that the government takes the safety and security of its people seriously. Firearms and other dangerous weapons are capable of causing significant harm and should not be taken lightly. The imposition of this condition helps to ensure that defendants who pose a risk to public safety are not allowed access to such weapons. The recognition of the dangers that such weapons pose to the public is a reflection of the government's commitment to safeguarding the lives of its people. The courts have discretion in determining whether or not to impose this condition, and the decision is based on certain factors, such as the nature of the crime committed, the seriousness of the offense, and the likelihood of the accused posing a threat to public safety. The courts also consider any relevant information about the defendant's background and past behavior to make an informed decision. Section 810.2(5) is crucial, especially in cases where the accused has a history of violent or aggressive behavior. When a judge imposes this condition on a recognizance, the defendant is monitored to ensure they do not have access to firearms or other prohibited weapons. This measure is a step towards achieving a safe and secure society by reducing the risk of violent incidents. It is crucial to note that the imposition of this condition is not meant to be punitive but is a necessary safeguard for public safety. It is a preventive measure aimed at ensuring that defendants who have been accused of crimes that pose a serious risk to public safety do not have access to dangerous weapons that could be used to cause harm. Moreover, it is also essential to note that the imposition of this condition does not restrict lawful owners' rights to possess firearms or other weapons. The prohibition only applies to defendants who are accused of crimes that pose a serious risk to public safety. This provision is consistent with the law's aim to balance the interest of public safety with individual rights. In conclusion, section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code of Canada is a critical provision in safeguarding public safety and ensuring that dangerous weapons are not in the hands of individuals who pose a threat to society. The provision's inclusion in the Criminal Code is a testament to the government's commitment to protecting the lives and interests of its people. The courts must exercise discretion in determining when to impose this condition and consider whether it is necessary to prevent public safety risks. It is also important to note that the restriction does not infringe upon lawful owners' rights and is a preventive measure aimed at ensuring a safe and secure society.

STRATEGY

Section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code of Canada provides for a protective measure that can ensure the safety of both the defendant and the public. This Section allows for a provincial court judge to prohibit the defendant from possessing specific items, including firearms, ammunition, and explosive substances, among others, during a specified period. Following are some strategic considerations when dealing with this section of the Criminal Code of Canada and some strategies that can be employed. One of the primary strategic considerations when dealing with Section 810.2(5) is the potential risk factors that the defendant poses to themselves or others. To obtain an order under this section, the judge must consider whether it is desirable to prohibit the defendant from possessing firearms, ammunition, or explosives in the interest of the defendant's safety or that of any other person. Therefore, a clear assessment of the danger the defendant poses and the extent of the harm that might occur is essential. The judge must be provided with all the necessary information, including the defendant's criminal history, their mental state, and their access to firearms. This information would help the judge in making an informed decision. Another strategic consideration is the timing of the application. Section 810.2 is a preventive measure that is imposed before a crime is committed. Therefore, it is crucial to apply for an order before the defendant has the opportunity to cause harm. When to apply for this order should be a matter of considerable debate. The application can be made during the bail hearing, during trial, or even prior to the arrest or charges being laid. It is essential to weigh the timing options carefully and determine when the application is most likely to succeed. Building a strong case in favor of the prohibition is an essential strategy when dealing with Section 810.2(5). The judge must be shown that a prohibition is necessary in the interest of protecting the public and the defendant. It is, therefore, vital to collect all relevant evidence and present a compelling case with a clear argument and facts that support the prohibition. This may include statements from witnesses, forensic evidence, expert testimony, and analysis of relevant facts. Furthermore, it is essential to have a clear understanding of the specific items that the judge can prohibit the defendant from possessing under this section. The judge cannot impose a blanket ban on any item but must specify the items that are prohibited in the order. Therefore, it is essential to understand what is considered a firearm or a prohibited weapon, among others. A clear understanding of the specific items can make the order more effective in protecting the public and the defendant. In conclusion, Section 810.2(5) of the Criminal Code of Canada is a preventive measure that can protect the public and the defendant from harm. Strategic considerations that should be kept in mind when dealing with this section include the potential risk factors that the defendant poses, the timing of the application, building a strong case in favor of the prohibition, and having a clear understanding of the specific items that can be prohibited. Employing these strategies should help increase the likelihood of a successful application for the protective order.