section 117.09(6)

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Provincial ministers cannot designate individuals if its not in the interest of safety.

SECTION WORDING

117.09(6) A provincial minister shall not designate an individual for the purpose of subsection (5) where it is not desirable, in the interests of the safety of any person, to designate the individual.

EXPLANATION

Section 117.09(6) of the Criminal Code of Canada addresses the issue of designation of individuals by provincial ministers. In specific, the section indicates that a provincial minister shall not designate an individual for the purpose of subsection (5) if it's not necessary for safeguarding the safety of any person. This provision is closely related to subsection (5), which allows provincial ministers to designate individuals or groups as terrorist entities. Such designations can have significant consequences, including asset freezing, travel restrictions, and criminal charges for related offenses. Consequently, the section sets forth a requirement that provincial ministers consider the safety of any person, including the designated individuals, before making such designations. The key phrase not desirable" means that a designating body must weigh the potential risks and benefits of a designation decision. Provincial ministers must assess the impact of designating an individual as a terrorist entity thoroughly, assess the risk associated with the designation, and balance it against protection interests of the people. The protection of public safety is a fundamental aspect of any national security regime. As noted in section 83.01 of the Criminal Code of Canada, the underlying principles of every national security regime should focus on collecting intelligence, preventing offenses, identifying threats and disruptions, and interdicting activities that have already taken place. In conclusion, section 117.09(6) of the Criminal Code of Canada makes it mandatory for provincial ministers to prioritize public safety when designating individuals as terrorist entities under subsection (5). While the designation is an effective tool for tackling terrorism, designating an individual or group must meet the legal thresholds, have clear evidence, and protect the safety of all persons is paramount.

COMMENTARY

Section 117.09(6) of the Criminal Code of Canada represents an important caveat in the process by which a provincial minister can designate an individual for the purpose of subsection (5). Specifically, the section mandates that the minister must take into account the safety of any person when making the designation, and that the individual designated must not pose a threat to public safety or other individuals. This provision is critical to ensuring that the individual designated does not pose a danger to society, and that the interests of public safety are prioritized above all else. It is essential that the government take responsibility for ensuring that those designated under subsection (5) do not pose a risk to the safety or well-being of any person, and that the public can feel secure in the knowledge that the designation process is being handled responsibly and ethically. Of course, there are potential issues with the way this provision is written and enforced. For one, there is the matter of what constitutes an unacceptable risk to public safety. This standard may be subjective or difficult to assess, leading to potential disagreements or inconsistencies in the application of the legislation. Furthermore, there may be fears that the provision could be used to unfairly discriminate against certain individuals or groups, particularly those who may be subject to baseless or prejudiced accusations of posing a threat to public safety. Despite these concerns, however, it is clear that the overall intent of Section 117.09(6) is a positive one. By emphasizing the importance of public safety in the designation process and providing guidelines to help ensure that only qualified, trustworthy individuals are designated under subsection (5), the law serves as a protective measure and helps to maintain social order within Canadian society. Ultimately, it is up to the government to uphold the standards set forth in this legislation and ensure that individuals designated under subsection (5) meet the necessary criteria for safety and reliability. By doing so, the government can help to maintain public trust in the legal system and ensure that the safety and well-being of all Canadians is protected to the fullest extent possible.

STRATEGY

Section 117.09(6) of the Criminal Code of Canada is an important provision that regulates the designation of individuals who pose a potential threat to the safety of others. This section prohibits provincial ministers from designating an individual under subsection (5) if it is not desirable in the interests of safety. This provision is a crucial component of the Canadian legal framework for addressing potential threats to public safety, and there are several strategic considerations that must be taken into account when dealing with this section. One of the most critical strategic considerations when dealing with section 117.09(6) is the balancing of interests between individual rights and public safety. While it is evident that the designation of individuals under subsection (5) may infringe on their civil liberties and human rights, it is important to recognize that this measure is designed to protect vulnerable individuals and communities from harm. Therefore, it is necessary to reconcile these competing interests when applying section 117.09(6) to ensure that the greater good is served. Another strategic consideration when dealing with section 117.09(6) is the need to ensure that the designation process is transparent and accountable. This means that clear criteria and guidelines must be established to determine when it is desirable to designate an individual under subsection (5), and these criteria must be applied consistently and uniformly. Additionally, mechanisms must be in place to review and challenge designations, and individuals must be afforded due process rights when challenging their designation. In terms of strategies that could be employed when dealing with section 117.09(6), one possibility is the use of risk assessment tools and protocols to identify individuals who may pose a potential threat to public safety. These tools could help to standardize risk assessments and ensure that they are carried out in a transparent and accountable manner. Additionally, training and education programs could be developed to equip law enforcement officials and other stakeholders with the skills and knowledge needed to apply section 117.09(6) effectively. Another strategy that could be employed when dealing with section 117.09(6) is the use of measures to address underlying causes of potential threats to public safety. For example, social programs and interventions may be effective in addressing the root causes of radicalization or other forms of violent behavior. By addressing these underlying factors, it may be possible to prevent individuals from posing a threat to public safety in the first place, reducing the need for designations under subsection (5). In conclusion, section 117.09(6) of the Criminal Code of Canada is a crucial provision that regulates the designation of individuals who may pose a potential threat to public safety. Strategic considerations when dealing with this section include the need to balance individual rights with public safety, ensure transparency and accountability, and employ effective risk assessment tools and protocols. Strategies that could be employed include using social programs and interventions to address underlying causes of potential threats, as well as providing training and education to equip stakeholders with the necessary skills and knowledge.