section 379

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Goods are defined as anything that can be traded or sold in this section of the Criminal Code of Canada.

SECTION WORDING

379 In this Part, "goods" means anything that is the subject of trade or commerce.

EXPLANATION

Section 379 of the Criminal Code of Canada defines the term goods" as anything that can be the subject of trade or commerce. This is an important aspect of the section as it sets the scope for the types of property that can be considered stolen in criminal cases. The term goods" is used throughout Part IX of the Criminal Code, which relates to offences related to theft, fraud, and forgery. The definition of goods is broad and includes tangible items such as merchandise, equipment, and vehicles, as well as intangible items such as intellectual property and financial instruments. This means that any property that can be bought or sold can be considered goods under the Criminal Code. Part IX of the Criminal Code contains several offences related to goods. Section 322 outlines the offence of theft, which occurs when a person fraudulently takes, uses, or converts property that belongs to someone else without their permission. Section 326 relates to the offence of fraud, which occurs when a person intentionally deceives another person in order to cause them harm or gain a benefit. Section 366 relates to the offence of forgery, which occurs when a person creates a false document with the intention of deceiving another person. The definition of goods in Section 379 is important because it helps to clarify the scope of these offences. It ensures that all types of property that can be bought or sold are covered under the Criminal Code, regardless of their physical or intangible form. This helps to ensure that the Criminal Code can effectively address a wide range of offences related to theft, fraud, and forgery, and helps to protect the interests of individuals and businesses.

COMMENTARY

Section 379 of the Criminal Code of Canada is a key provision in the context of Canadian criminal law. It defines the term 'goods' which is used throughout Part IX of the Criminal Code that is focused on offences related to property. The definition is fairly broad and includes anything that can be subject to trade or commerce. The definition of goods as presented in Section 379 is important for a number of reasons. It is a key legal concept that is used in a wide range of contexts related to property and commerce. This includes areas such as theft, fraud, and money laundering. It is also used in other areas of law such as contract law and intellectual property law. At its core, the definition of goods as presented in Section 379 is designed to capture all types of property that can be bought or sold. This can include physical objects such as cars, clothing, and furniture, as well as intangible items such as patents, copyrights, and trademarks. The definition is intentionally broad in order to encompass as many types of property as possible. One of the key implications of this definition is that it makes clear that not all property is considered 'goods' under the law. For example, property that is not intended for trade or commerce, such as personal items or household goods, would likely not be considered 'goods' under the definition provided in Section 379. This is important because it helps to ensure that the law is targeted specifically at commercial activity. Another key aspect of the definition of goods in Section 379 is that it is not limited to any particular type of commerce. This means that it is intended to capture any property that is subject to trade or commerce, regardless of whether it is bought or sold in a traditional market setting or through more modern channels such as e-commerce. This is important because it helps to ensure that the law is flexible and can adapt to changing forms of commerce. Overall, Section 379 of the Criminal Code of Canada is an important provision that helps to define the legal concept of 'goods' in the context of Canadian criminal law. It is a broad definition that is intended to capture all types of property that can be bought or sold in trade or commerce. As such, it is a key legal concept that is used in a wide range of contexts related to property and commerce.

STRATEGY

Section 379 of the Criminal Code of Canada imposes criminal sanctions for various types of property crimes. The section defines goods" broadly as anything that is the subject of trade or commerce. This means that any item that is bought, sold, or exchanged in the marketplace falls within the ambit of this provision. Given the breadth of this definition, it is important for businesses and individuals to consider how they go about dealing with goods in order to avoid running afoul of this section. One of the primary strategic considerations when dealing with Section 379 is to ensure that one is licensed or authorized to trade in the goods in question. Many types of goods are subject to government regulations or restrictions, and failing to comply with these requirements can result in criminal charges. For example, the sale of firearms or drugs without the proper licenses or permits can lead to serious penalties. Similarly, the trade of endangered species or cultural artifacts may be prohibited by law, and individuals who engage in these types of activities may face criminal charges. Another strategic consideration when dealing with Section 379 is to ensure that one is dealing with legitimate goods and not stolen or fraudulently obtained goods. Individuals who acquire or possess stolen goods, or who sell goods with known defects without disclosing this information to buyers, may face criminal charges. It is important for businesses and individuals to conduct due diligence when acquiring goods in order to minimize the risk of inadvertently dealing with stolen or fraudulent items. In addition to these basic considerations, there are a number of strategies that businesses and individuals can employ to minimize their risk of criminal liability under Section 379. One such strategy is to ensure that there are clear policies and procedures in place for acquiring, storing, and selling goods. These policies should emphasize the importance of complying with all relevant laws and regulations, as well as conducting appropriate due diligence to minimize risks. They should also include procedures for responding to suspicious transactions or requests, such as requests to deal in high-value goods without proper documentation or proof of ownership. Another strategy is to maintain accurate records of all goods transactions, including the identification of all parties involved, the nature of the goods, and the date and value of the transaction. This can help to demonstrate that an individual or business acted in good faith and did not knowingly engage in any illegal activities. It can also help to detect and prevent fraudulent or illegal activities. Overall, dealing with Section 379 of the Criminal Code of Canada requires careful consideration of a number of factors, including regulatory requirements, due diligence, record-keeping, and risk management strategies. By taking a proactive approach to these issues, individuals and businesses can minimize their risk of criminal liability and ensure that they are operating in compliance with all relevant laws and regulations.