section 487.09(3)

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Voluntarily provided bodily substances and DNA analysis results must be promptly destroyed if they do not match the individual in question.

SECTION WORDING

487.09(3) Bodily substances that are provided voluntarily by a person and the results of forensic DNA analysis shall be destroyed or, in the case of results in electronic form, access to those results shall be permanently removed, without delay after the results of that analysis establish that the bodily substance referred to in paragraph 487.05(1)(b) was not from that person.

EXPLANATION

Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada relates to the use of forensic DNA analysis in criminal investigations. The section explains that if a person voluntarily provides bodily substance for forensic DNA analysis and if the analysis reveals that the substance was not from that person, then the substance and its results must be destroyed or access to them must be permanently removed without any delay. The use of forensic DNA analysis in criminal investigations has become increasingly common in recent years, and it is an effective tool in identifying suspects and solving crimes. However, the use of this technology has also raised concerns about privacy and the protection of individual rights. This is where section 487.09(3) comes in to protect the rights of individuals who may have provided their bodily substances for testing. The section clearly states that the bodily substance should be voluntarily provided, which means that the person must have given their informed consent for the analysis. It also specifies that if the analysis confirms that the substance is not from that person, then the substance and its results must be destroyed or access to them must be permanently removed. This is to ensure that the personal information of the individual is not used improperly or retained without their consent. Overall, section 487.09(3) plays an important role in safeguarding individual rights and privacy in the use of forensic DNA analysis in criminal investigations. It ensures that the personal information of individuals is protected, and that the use of this technology is done in a responsible and ethical manner.

COMMENTARY

Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada is a law that governs the use of bodily substances for forensic DNA analysis in the criminal justice system. The law provides guidelines for destroying or permanently removing access to the bodily substance and DNA analysis results when it is established that the sample did not come from the person from whom it was collected. The purpose of this law is to protect the privacy rights of individuals who voluntarily provide bodily substances for forensic DNA analysis. The law recognizes that, while this analysis is an important tool in identifying suspects and proving guilt in criminal cases, it can also be an invasion of privacy. Therefore, the law aims to strike a balance between the need for forensic evidence and the right to privacy. The law applies to all bodily substances that are voluntarily provided by a person for forensic DNA analysis. This includes blood, saliva, hair, and other bodily fluids. Additionally, the law requires that the results of any DNA analysis performed on this bodily substance must be destroyed or have access removed, without delay, once it is established that the sample did not come from the person who provided it. The immediate destruction of the DNA analysis results provides a safeguard against the unauthorized use or disclosure of this information. By destroying this information, there is no risk of a breach of privacy and the individual can be assured that their DNA will not be used for any other purpose. The law provides important protections for individuals who voluntarily provide DNA samples for forensic analysis. It ensures that their privacy rights are respected, and the DNA sample is not used inappropriately. However, it is important to note that this law applies only to voluntary samples and not to those collected involuntarily or through a court-order. In conclusion, Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada is an important law that provides protections for individuals who voluntarily provide bodily substances for forensic DNA analysis. It balances the need for forensic evidence with the right to privacy, and ensures the DNA analysis results are destroyed or permanently removed if the sample was not from the person who provided it. This law is a crucial safeguard that protects the privacy of individuals and demonstrates the Canadian government's commitment to upholding privacy rights.

STRATEGY

Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada highlights the importance of respecting individual privacy and acknowledging the consequences of misusing DNA analysis. It mandates the timely destruction of bodily substances that were obtained voluntarily, along with the results of forensic DNA analysis if the substance is not from the person providing it. When dealing with Section 487.09(3), several strategic considerations come to mind. Firstly, it is necessary to ensure that the people involved understand their rights and obligations under the law. For instance, if law enforcement officials obtain a bodily substance from an individual, they must immediately inform them of the purpose for which it is being collected and the implications of the results. Additionally, they must ensure that the individual understands that they have the right to withdraw their consent at any time. Another strategic consideration is the importance of protecting the privacy and security of the information obtained through forensic DNA analysis. Law enforcement officials must ensure that strict protocols are in place to prevent unauthorized access or misuse of the information. Moreover, the use of forensic DNA analysis should be guided by clear and transparent policies that promote accountability and oversight. One strategy for ensuring compliance with Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada is to implement regular audits and monitoring mechanisms to track the handling and destruction of bodily substances and DNA analysis results. This could involve establishing audit committees or hiring external consultants to review the handling of such information on a periodic basis. Another strategy involves investing in training programs for law enforcement officials and other relevant stakeholders. This training should cover the legal, moral, and ethical issues surrounding the use of forensic DNA analysis, as well as the implications of Section 487.09(3) for the handling and destruction of bodily substances. Such training should also focus on the importance of protecting individual privacy and the consequences of misusing DNA analysis. In conclusion, Section 487.09(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada is a critical element in protecting individual privacy and promoting responsible use of forensic DNA analysis. The strategic considerations highlighted above are essential in ensuring that this section is implemented effectively and that the privacy and security of individuals are protected. Adherence to these strategies could lead to greater public trust and confidence in the criminal justice system.