section 487.1(3)

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION

An oath may be administered through telecommunication for the purposes of subsection (2).

SECTION WORDING

487.1(3) For the purposes of subsection (2), an oath may be administered by telephone or other means of telecommunication.

EXPLANATION

Section 487.1(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada provides for the use of telecommunication means in the administration of oaths, specifically for the purpose of obtaining a warrant. This section acknowledges the increasing prevalence of technology in our daily lives and how it can be harnessed to facilitate judicial proceedings. According to subsection (2), a peace officer can apply for a warrant to search or seize property that is believed to be connected to an offense. Before the warrant can be issued, the officer must swear an oath that outlines the grounds for the application. Normally, this oath is sworn in person before a justice of the peace. However, in certain circumstances, it may be more efficient or necessary to administer the oath remotely. The use of telecommunication means to administer an oath under subsection 487.1(3) allows judicial processes to be streamlined, especially in remote areas where physical access to a justice of the peace may be challenging. This technology also makes it easier for officers to obtain a warrant in a timely manner, which is crucial in situations where evidence may be lost or destroyed if a warrant is not executed promptly. However, it is important to note that the use of technology to administer oaths must still comply with the principles of natural justice. The person administering the oath must be able to verify the identity of the officer and ensure that they fully understand the solemnity of the situation. The use of telecommunication means to administer an oath should not be seen as a shortcut or a way to circumvent legal procedures. In conclusion, section 487.1(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada recognizes technology as a valuable tool in the administration of justice. This provision enables peace officers to seek warrants more efficiently and effectively while still maintaining the integrity of the judicial process.

COMMENTARY

Section 487.1(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada states that an oath may be administered by telephone or other means of telecommunication. This provision is notable as it allows for a more flexible approach to taking oaths in judicial proceedings, which can often be time-consuming and logistically challenging. There are several benefits to allowing for the administration of oaths by phone or other means of telecommunication. For one, it can save time and resources. Traveling to administer an oath in person can be time-consuming and can add unnecessary costs to the legal process. Allowing for telecommunication can therefore streamline the process, allowing for oaths to be administered effectively and efficiently from a distance. In addition, allowing for oaths to be administered by phone or other means of telecommunication can also increase access to justice. Particularly in rural or remote areas, it may be difficult to secure the presence of an individual to administer an oath in person. By allowing for telecommunication, individuals in these areas can still have access to justice and participate in legal proceedings without having to travel long distances. Despite these benefits, some critics may argue that allowing for oaths to be administered by phone or other means of telecommunication could increase the risk of fraudulent activity. With oaths being administered remotely, there may be concerns about the authenticity of the oath and whether the person taking it is who they say they are. This issue could be particularly concerning in cases where the oath is being taken in a high-stakes legal proceeding. However, it is worth noting that there are safeguards in place to ensure the authenticity of oaths taken by telecommunication. For example, the person administering the oath may require identification or other forms of verification to confirm the identity of the person taking the oath. Additionally, there may be recording and transcription devices in place to ensure that the oath is accurately recorded and can be reviewed if necessary. Overall, Section 487.1(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada is an important provision that allows for more flexible and accessible administration of oaths in legal proceedings. While there may be concerns about the authenticity of oaths taken by telecommunication, there are also safeguards in place to ensure the integrity of the process. Ultimately, this provision can help increase access to justice and streamline the legal process, while still maintaining the necessary level of authenticity and accuracy in administering oaths.

STRATEGY

Section 487.1(3) of the Criminal Code of Canada allows for oaths to be administered through means of telecommunication, such as over the phone. It is important for legal professionals to understand the strategic considerations when dealing with this section of the Code, as it can have an impact on the outcome of criminal cases. Some of the strategic considerations and strategies that could be employed include the following: 1. Convenience and Accessibility: The ability to administer oaths through telecommunication provides greater convenience and accessibility for individuals who may not be able to appear in person due to issues such as distance or illness. This can be particularly important for witnesses who may be required to give testimony, but cannot be physically present in court. Legal professionals should consider whether this option is necessary or appropriate for their case. 2. Technical Considerations: When administering oaths through telecommunication, there may be technical considerations that need to be taken into account. For example, there may be issues of connectivity or the quality of the audio. Legal professionals should ensure that these technical issues are resolved prior to the administration of the oath. 3. Authentication: There may be concerns about the authenticity of an oath that is administered through telecommunication. Legal professionals should take steps to ensure that the person administering the oath is appropriately authorized and that proper records are kept to authenticate the oath. 4. Legal Standards: The use of telecommunication to administer oaths must comply with legal standards. For example, the person administering the oath must still be considered a "commissioner for taking affidavits" or an "authorized witness" under the law. Legal professionals should ensure that they are following all legal standards and requirements. 5. Privacy and Security: The use of telecommunication to administer oaths may raise privacy and security concerns. For example, there may be issues with recording the conversation or transmitting sensitive information over the phone. Legal professionals should ensure that they are taking appropriate measures to protect the privacy and security of all parties involved. In terms of strategies that could be employed, legal professionals may want to consider training witnesses or clients on the use of telecommunication to administer oaths. They may also want to establish protocols and procedures for ensuring the authenticity of the oath and for protecting privacy and security. Finally, legal professionals should carefully evaluate whether the use of telecommunication to administer oaths is necessary and appropriate for their case.